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18-step gaussgun

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In the days of my youth, when Fallout was still remembered by the masses and every other schoolboy played Stalker, it was fashionable among the technically educated youth to assemble (or at least try to assemble) gaussgans, raylgans and other "wunderwaffles" seen in computer games. Some sites maintained world rankings of amateur builds, and of course I wanted to be the first in them. To that end, I conceived of putting together an 18-stage gaussgun.
18-step gaussgun
I was prompted to write about this Gaussgan by this article It briefly describes the construction of the single-stage Gaussgan, so I won’t repeat myself. The point of a multistage gaussgan is that the projectile, after leaving the first coil, is immediately accelerated by the next coil, and thus each stage would add speed to it a little at a time.
Since my knowledge and skills in the field of construction at the time were not great, I decided to make everything as simple and without frills as possible. The barrel was a 10mm brass tube from a building store, the "trunk" was a piece of galvanized profile, the "frame" was a sheet of textolite, and the body was a square conduit. The thyristors were found in a hardware store, the capacitors were soldered out of CRT monitors, and the optocouplers were from ball mice. Other parts were found at some flea markets and in some old home appliances. Next are a few pics of the reassembly process:
18-step gaussgun
18-step gaussgun
18-step gaussgun
18-step gaussgun
18-step gaussgun
18-step gaussgun
The wire diameter, the number of turns, geometric parameters of the coils, capacitance of the capacitors, and the response delay of the optocouplers in each stage had to be chosen individually to achieve the maximum efficiency, and to calculate the efficiency it was necessary to test firing different types of bullets after each change – in short, this "adjustment" took quite a long time. I used nail clippings as bullets :
18-step gaussgun
To charge the capacitors from a 12v battery, I assembled a reversing converter, which was powerful enough to power a 220v light bulb at full power:
Also came up with a stage controller on a Schmidt trigger :
18-step gaussgun
When all the steps were in place, I suddenly remembered that a gaussgun needed a handle to hold it and a trigger. The handle was the body from a broken drill, and the trigger was the button from a microwave oven.
18-step gaussgun
18-step gaussgun
This is what the finished Gaussgan looked like :
18-step gaussgun
A couple of video tests (apologies in advance for the quality):
And now a little bit about TTx :
Energy stored in capacitors – 550 J
Bullet energy – 28 J
Bullet speed – 70 m/s
Bullet weight – 11.4 g
Bullet diameter – 8 mm
EFFICIENCY — 5.09%
At the time it was the world’s most powerful homemade portable gaussgun. I wanted to make a magazine and sights for it, but that wasn’t going to happen because my ego had already been satisfied. I had more ambitious "wunderwaffle" projects, but I gradually abandoned them and gradually moved on to other areas of technical creativity.

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