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Designer claims copywriting on periodic table of HTML5 elements

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Designer Alara Mills drew a periodic table of HTML5 elements in 2009 and has been selling posters with infographics for $20 to $140.In the meantime, it continues to harass designers who dare to create something similar and put it out in the public domain. The "copyright holder" has lawsuits and DMCA requests in its arsenal.
The first precedent happened in December 2010, when she sued programmer Josh Duck for his version of of the periodic table with 104 elements. Although that one had a much more advanced version, with links to W3C documents and the ability to display the most commonly used elements on any site.
Designer claims copywriting on periodic table of HTML5 elements
Josh Duck’s version of the periodic table
Duck and Mills’ work differed greatly, but the latter claimed that Josh Duck had somehow obtained a preprint of a previous version of the table before it was published and made an "illegal arbitrary work" based on it. True, she had the evidence, just the preprint itself.
Designer claims copywriting on periodic table of HTML5 elements
Alara Mills’ 2009 preprint
After receiving a subpoena, Josh Duck chose not to waste time in the courts and settled amicably with the author of the original work. He removed table from online, and Mrs. Mills waived the claim.
Now she has a new target: another programmer, Mike Riethmuller. He’s got a copy of the DMCA request for removal of his periodic HTML5 element table From Github hosting
Designer claims copywriting on periodic table of HTML5 elements
Mike Ritmuller’s version of the periodic table
His table is based on Duck’s table and looks just as little like posters Mills. That hasn’t stopped Mills, however, from demanding that the table be removed under the DMCA and from threatening to sue, where the defendant faces up to $150, 000 in damages.
In the complaint letter, the author claims that the unique arrangement of elements and color scheme make her infographic a unique work that cannot be in the public domain and is protected by copyright.
But Mike Ritmuller was not so simple. He wrote back on his blog that he doesn’t understand the nature of the claims, and that his work is based on works that are in the public domain : these are elements from Mozilla Developer Network and a table template by sample work Dmitriy Mendeleev (an ancient infographic specialist).
In turn, and Mills so far Isn’t giving up and even accuses male geeks of sexism. They’re offended, they say, that a girl was able to think of something before they did.
Designer claims copywriting on periodic table of HTML5 elements

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